Reflection 2016

By: Made Here

Archive of Participating Artists in Reflection: Made Here

Sara Wichterman

FAIR School

Carly Beseman + Lindsay Keating

Christopher Lutter-Gardella

Sharol Nau

Dana Sikkila

Lizardman

Jes Reyes + Katie Rensch

ADDAM + Omen

Eddie Hoon Yang

Stephanie Glaros

Ruthie Krech

Erin Lavelle + Anthony Chapin

Inna Valin

Brian Skalak

Kathy McTavish

Tim Carroll

Dunwoody College of Technology

Erik Pearson

Kulture Klub Collaborative

Carolina Borja

Rebecca Krinke & team

Rhys Jones

Brian Matthew Hart

Christopher Selleck

Maggie Thompson

Pat Benincasa

Gillian McLaughlin

Amy Sands

Leslie Barlow

Jeffrey Haddorff

Aaron Brand

Christopher E. Harrison

Zach Nagle

Tara Costello

Bailey Cahlander

St. Paul Slim

The Minneapolis Beard & Moustache Club

Jim Denomie

James Wrayge

Sandi Thompson

 

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Sara Wichterman

Shadow Creatures

Notions of human superiority lead to selfish, destructive behaviors. They create a false sense of entitlement to justify abuse and disregard of other living beings and all facets of nature. I mourn the loss of inherent connection between humans and all other life forms, especially animals.

Headless animal figures dwell, loom, and scurry against a basement’s cavernous wall. The dark, mysterious qualities of the projection and the sculptures create an otherworldly, psychological space for reflection and evoke questions of the unknown. The creatures are not identified as a particular species, acting as a stand in for all living beings.

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FAIR School

Our humanness is reflected in the eye of the beholder

accelerating the rate of change in a contemporary world

empathy and sacred oneness

seen through the lens of privilege or expectation

curved edges or shattered lines

Magical stories and sacred images unite

to listen, understand, and heal

document dynamic relationships

uncover multiple realities

remind individuals of fragile ecosystems and lost societies...

The ordinary is extraordinary

when we remember to pay attention.

 

This art has been student-created, and student-selected.

Organized by Larry Nelson and Alison Criss.

Welcome to #FAIRNATION.

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Carly Beseman + Lindsay Keating

Our Bedroom

“Today your bedroom is the backstage area where you prepare for your performance in the theatre of the world.”

- Lucy Worsley, “An Intimate History of the Bedroom.” If Walls Could Talk.

The bedroom is often our deepest personal space, both an internal and physical space we can keep private. However, it is not immune to outside influence and reflects what we absorb from society as well.  Our Bedroom is a psychological space that gives a fantastical tangibility to everyday issues affecting women both today and historically. The room is divided down the center, the left side as the Victorian era and the right side as the modern era. Each side mirrors the other in object placement and theme. These themes are visualized through the arrangement, manipulation and reimagining of objects which depict the significant challenges faced by women. Many of these challenges have remained the same while others have taken on new forms. Metaphor and juxtaposition of objects allows one to make comparisons emphasized by size, visibility, functionality, sparsity, and abundance.

As Worsley states, we prepare backstage for the world, but, simultaneously, outside influences enter into the psychological realm conditioning and altering the notions of private refuge and personal expression. Infused with expectations of femininity, our personal spaces become a ground for struggle, negotiation and navigation. What are the forces that influence us? How do we see ourselves reflected through the past? What new challenges do we face and what obstacles have we overcome?

Our Parlour

“The parlour was the centre of the Victorian home….and the place where contemporary conflicts about domesticity and gender relations were played out.”

-Thad Logan, The Victorian Parlour

The parlour and the modern equivalent, the kitchen or dining room, is, paradoxically, the area that exists between a social, often societal, space and our own private domain; a smaller separate area has been used to convey this impression. Simplified, this area is also divided into past and present, halved down the center. The past shares a table with the present. Upon the table rests familiar ritualized objects with hindered functionality calling into question the value of domestic societal expectations. On the contemporary side, crowding in are other objects representing outside responsibilities, stressors, and the burdens that come with a career driven, tech fueled modern day lifestyle.

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Christopher Lutter-Gardella

Pillar of People

I believe that art is a tool that may be used to not only reflect our reality, but also to shape it. It may also be utilized as a way to hone our own perceptions of what, quite often, happens to be an elephant in the room. The thing is, even if we all agree upon the fact that the elephant is there, we can still neglect to follow-up on the reality that there are actually some people pinned beneath it.

In the malaise of our national wealth—the comfort and safety that it provides—the continuous hum of media noise that it foists upon us—the endless supply of goods and services…we forget about the network of systems and (yes) people, that brought it all to our table—oftimes against their will.

Oh to have the memory of an elephant… and to not forget. Our nation, the richest, most powerful and…. greatest? (as so many seem to claim) stands upon a world of suffering and grief—and the privileged few stand upon the backs of the laboring many.

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Sharol Nau

Reflections of Heath Creek

Reflection appears to me as self-examination in one form or another. As an individual I reflect my ancestors, my friends, and my view of the world around me. In my art the new work reflects the artist I’ve been over the years, even when I’m doing my hardest to pursue something new, to examine experimental avenues of creativity

My favorite reflections are the images I’ve observed at a nearby creek that meanders through a wooded, mosquito infested area. A few years ago the stream met a log lodged in a curve along with a collection of stone that blocked its flow. The inhibited flow of water allowed for a wavy/gently-swirling mirror which reflected whatever was lingering over it, clouds, sun, trees, etc. . Even though the creek has changed due to flooding and shifting of the elements which made it so visually special, I can’t let it go. Elements of that creek creep into my work on an ongoing basis.

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Dana Sikkila

Murphy Migration

My work displays through visual repetition, the obsessive relationships between a woman and her best friends, whom she can not live without. Objects, insects, and animals provide her companionship, creating coves of comfort and ease. Her personal honesty motivate the work, depicting the absence of self control within the female mind. Animals and objects begin to take on human characteristics and interact in unconventional domestic situations built inside the white-walled gallery. Through printmaking and large scale installation the viewer is confronted with these obsessive natures. Repeating images move from wall to wall, showcasing a larger form deriving from one single shape. These installations overtake the vertical surface, turning atypical tendencies into a humorous, almost adorable mental mess; which represents the psyche, conjuring these problems onto thousands of pieces of paper and products.

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Lizardman

Empire State

Creating an alternate landscape from elements of the environment that surrounds this location, the series is a broken-mirror glimpse of our walking life downtown. By using images, type and logos out of context, I hope to suggest just how pervasive digital and print advertising is in our field of vision every day. The imagery is driven by deep apprehension about rapidly evolving technology and media saturation.

Lizardman is a painter, illustrator and designer, and co-founder of Rogue Citizen artist collective.

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Jes Reyes + Katie Rensch

Components

Components is a silent short video poem that layers moving image with word, and explores how our bodies intersect the man-made and natural world. To speak to these two worlds, a poetic voice emerges to translate what the body feels and says to its segmented existence. The main subject is a woman who uses sign language to describe what she sees: river, tree, cloud, skyline. But this translation of her world is not enough to fully describe her experience in it. Counterpart to the woman, the city and natural geography of Minneapolis develops as a second character in the video that interacts with the woman's language. We see images of the Minneapolis skyline layered against images of the woman and a tree that climax into a world that wants to see beyond divisions and into one that accepts wholly its complex place. 

As artists we are behind each frame and every word. We hope the viewer becomes an active participant in this work, as well. The accompanying photographic images, which abstract the tree and represent the photographic elements of the video poem, surround the screen, and are worked into the display to expand the viewers experience while watching the video.

Jes Reyes and Katie Rensch are interdisciplinary artists and are proud to be Minnesotans. They met while in graduate school at the University of Minnesota. This is their 3rd collaboration. Their first video poem, A Mind of Winter, participated in the 2015 MNTV season, which is a collaboration between the Independent Filmmaker Project Minnesota (IFP MN), Twin Cities Public Television (TPT) and Walker Art Center, and funded by The Jerome Foundation.

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ADDAM + Omen

Selfie MADE or Self MADE

This project offers an opportunity for participants to engage in various visual Q&A's through social media. Blending motion typography, selfies, gifs - this project will aggregate unique forms of social data visualization housed under the #selfmademn.

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Eddie Hoon Yang

# (TBD) Filmic Paintings

“It was just like a movie…”

During moments of reflection, where reality outgrows its imagination, we often remark on how cinematic life can be. 

Film, like memories, need to be built from the ground up. 

With the potential to be altered from the truth the more times we remember them.

The memories we revisit the most, are the memories furthest from the truth.

With the camera as the eyes, recording moments as they happen. 

Re-experiencing is an editing process.

Highlighting, erasing, adding elements or moments that didn’t originally appear. 

Reflections of the city, not as they are, but as they may be.

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Stephanie Glaros

Humans of Minneapolis

In March 2010, I began capturing portraits of people I encountered on my daily walk from home to work in downtown Minneapolis. My camera provided the perfect excuse to break through social barriers, and interact with people I might not otherwise meet. I titled this series Minneapolis Strangers. In 2013, I relaunched the project as Humans of Minneapolis. Inspired by Humans of New York, I began to focus on not only the photographs, but also the conversations. I included audio clips to add texture to the stories, and to allow my subjects to speak with their own voices. This project has connected me to a network of hundreds of “Humans” pages based in cities all over the world. This piece is a compilation of some of my favorite interactions from this project.

Stephanie Glaros is a photographer and videographer based in Minneapolis. From 2005 to 2012, she was the Art Director for Utne Reader magazine, where she developed an interest in photojournalism, and realized the profound impact of storytelling. She has a B.A. in Women’s Studies from the University of Montana, and an A.A.S. in Graphic Design from Minneapolis Community and Technical College. In 2011, she joined the Graphic Design Department at MCTC as an instructor. In addition to her blog, she has a regular column in Southwest Journal.

www.facebook.com/humansofmpls

www.stephanieglaros.com

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Ruthie Krech

Monuments to the Ordinary

The subjects I explore in my work are the mundane or ordinary experiences in life. These things span from drinking a cup of coffee to brushing your teeth. Activities like this make up so much of our life; they are our life rituals. My goal through this work is to call attention to these experiences. Things that are called mundane or ordinary should be seen as more precious or significant. They should be seen this way because they are a part of our freedom and are more of a privilege than we may realize.

I bring life into my artwork. The simple sometimes-overlooked ritual is made into a type of monument to ordinary experience. The viewer is asked to see significance in mundane ritual.

ruthiekrech.com/artist

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Erin Lavelle + Anthony Chapin

Paid in Full!

Paid in Full! is a reflection on the ongoing issue of sweatshop labor and our responsibility as consumers when purchasing goods. What are the true costs beyond the few dollars we spend? Who else is paying for these goods with their health, life, and safety? How can we make more compassionate and conscious choices?

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Inna Valin

Bellweather

I am a fine art photographer working on an exploratory documentary series mostly in the streets and public spaces of Minneapolis. My works are metaphorical representations of the human condition, meant to epitomize the universal human experience as well embodying the here and now of our time and place. I seek to illustrate the kind of ineffable beauty that is beyond the superficial. My works speak of ethereal beauty carved of our humanity and imperfection, the invisible woman, the disappearing man, of life in the margins and the middle of the road. Beauty abstruse, mystical, impudent and authentic; composed in the delicate gray tones of human frailty and grit. 

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Brian Skalak

What do YOU see?

When thinking about the theme, reflection, What do YOU see touches on both literal and figurative aspects of the word.

In the literal sense, a Rorschach-style image is traditionally made up of ink blots reflected across the y-axis to form a subjective image. 

In a more figurative sense, the viewer is encouraged to interpret the image as they see fit. What they decide will ultimately be a reflection of their inner self. 

As you're viewing, share what you see with those around you or with the hashtag, "#WhatDoYouSeeMN" to join the larger conversation.

Brian Skalak is a Minneapolis-based tinkerer, dreamer and manic thinker who's only recently become overwhelmed with the desire to create. For him, any item or medium can become an inspiration to evolve into something well beyond it's physical qualities. 

See what's going on inside his head at insidebrainsbrain.com

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Kathy McTavish

http://z3r0.io/

It was like this every morning ... no sleep ::: etched across z3r0's skull ::: fevered computations : a cypher ...  ::: 

z3r0.io is part of a larger body of work called "the railway prophecies" funded in part by the Jerome Foundation and the Arrowhead Regional Arts Council.

Artist statement :: I am a cellist, composer and digital media artist. I create cross-sensory, immersive landscapes. My work blends data, text, code, sound and abstract, layered moving images. My recent work has focused on creating generative methods for building multichannel video and sound environments that flow from the web to the room.

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Tim Carroll

Do You See What I See?

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Dunwoody College of Technology

Jake Ritzman for Dunwoody College of Technology

Title: “Only Death Knows…”

I designed this piece to be a reflection on life and death, both in the literal and metaphorical sense. The idea is that when someone stands in the right position in front of the mirror it’s possible to match your own reflection with the skeleton, a universal symbol of death. Most people are somewhat discomforted by facing their own mortality, usually that’s related to the uncertainty of what actually happens to us. I’ve personally always had somewhat of a morbid curiosity about death and what happens in the afterlife because of that uncertainty, and this is what the poem reflects on. Every cultural background or variant faith around the world has it’s own beliefs and rituals based on death and the afterlife, but the fascinating thing is that when it comes down to it, it’s all just theory. Not one single person alive truly knows what happens, and I find that absolutely fascinating. One thing is certain though; death is inevitable, so why fear it? As far as what happens, well, there’s only one way to find out…

Artist: Ashley LeMay for Dunwoody College of Technology! !

Title: ..can you see yourself in me?! !!!

The concept of reflection is close to me; I am someone who continuously reflects. The

idea for this installation came to me one night as I was falling asleep. The line drawings were

taken from my direct point of view of myself in the mirror, and I saw this as a way to create

myself as I am seen by the world. After I began to draw, I realized it was difficult it was to see

the illustrations because of what was being reflected in the mirrors. I thought stopping at that

point because I often feel lost in the commotion around me. I have been a journal writer for

roughly a decade and I decided to include the writing to make the lines easier to recognize and

add a layer of depth; self-reflection. As I poured over my past, I choose to include parts of

entries if they met one of the following qualifications: the statement still resounds as true with

me, I found the statement entertaining, the statement reflects a turning point/time of

contemplation of my identity, or the statement is an example of an extreme moment of strength

or weakness. The script is not meant to be easily read, it is there as a backdrop but carries so

much of me.The title abstractly expresses my curiosity about my internal dialogue being

relatable, and literally, a viewer seeing their own reflection within my image.

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Erik Pearson

Roughnecks & Roustabouts

Ladies and gentlemen...as you slept comfortably in your bed, the roughnecks and roustabouts worked throughout the night, to bring life to a  magical circus. The empty field that you saw just yesterday is now a whirlwind of lights, sounds, excitement, and performers. In the great storied tradition of the circus performer, these characters rely on their multi-tasking skills to amaze, bewilder, and entertain you with their inhuman abilities.

Step right up...don't be shy.

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Kulture Klub Collaborative

Reflections on The Downtown 100

Downtown Minneapolis is concentrated with resources, transportation options, commerce, and public spaces, making it a desirable place for many Minnesotans to live and work. However, not all Minnesotans have equal access to Downtown Minneapolis. Youth struggling with homelessness, many of whom are people of color, may not be as welcome as others because of racial profiling and other stigmas.

‘Reflections on The Downtown 100’ was an arts-based community development effort that engaged young people who are routinely criminalized, marginalized, and overlooked. Kulture Klub Collaborative partnered with local artists to work with young people identified by the Downtown 100 Initiative, a joint effort between the city, county, and downtown development groups to reduce area crime and connect groups of individuals with the most police interaction to social services and housing.  

Using storytelling, music, and visual art, the project asks participants questions like: What is your relationship to Downtown? When was the first time you visited? What kind of police interactions have you had? The results were empowering for the youth involved. They saw themselves as productive, positive members of the downtown community, not just the labels that have been placed on them.

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Carolina Borja

Love Birds

Artist Statement for Reflection. Love Birds is a piece inspired on a scene I stepped into not long ago on Nicollet Avenue, the image of two birds that collide till death. Based on the scene this incident is due to the mirroring effects created by skyscrapers. The realization of how external circumstances affected their paths and ended in disaster has made me realize how similar this effect was to human relationships. I ponder on how in relationships our emotions get constantly mirrored and they convert into an obstacle that impairs our natural flight.

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Rebecca Krinke & team

Bird Bodies

Many artists have been inspired by shop windows - the Paris surrealists in particular. They photographed window displays for their uncanny juxtapositions of objects, the passerby peering into them, and the myriad layers of reflections on glass. These artists also made their own window displays, with mannequins a favorite object of theirs.

This installation continues my investigation into dream-like objects and environments of wonder and terror. Here, dress forms evoke both human and bird bodies. Set into a vacant storefront in the downtown city streets, the installation provokes questions about human bodies, animal bodies, domestic settings, wild environments, display, art, commodity, cities, and dreams.

Team: Austin Evert, Addison Gallager, Olivia Lyster

rebeccakrinke.com

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Rhys Jones

Requiem for a Stranger

“Requiem for a Stranger” is, in short, about suicide and compassion.

In the spring of 2014, a U of M student went missing and was later found to have jumped off of a bridge into the Mississippi.  There was a great deal of media coverage, but the sentence that grabbed me by the throat was something to the effect of “She was alone at the time when she went into the river.”  Upon reading this line, my mind immediate painted me an image not of someone jumping off of a bridge to their death, but rather one of a woman walking calmly and serenely into the river and just disappearing.  The days following this incident I experienced what I can only call an empathy attack - I never knew this woman, our lives had almost nothing to do with each other, and yet I felt so strongly and deeply for and with her. 

Many times, I use art as a means of digging into and processing experiences and emotions - so that I can pour myself into the creation of something that speaks to and illustrates what I’m thinking and feeling, and afterwards be able to let go, having placed those thoughts, feelings, and experiences into something concrete, existing somewhere outside of my head and heart.  This was the intention in creating this image, and while it served this purpose for the original experience, the timing of my work on this piece ended up coinciding with losing a friend of my own to suicide and it became something more: I was no longer merely processing my (somewhat inexplicable) emotions stemming from the death of a stranger, but it also became a means of allowing myself to mourn and attempting to understand someone much closer to me choosing to end their life.

This piece is in no way meant to romanticize suicide - but rather to provoke conversation and consideration about suicide, mental illness, and loneliness, and perhaps to pass along a bit of the empathy that gave root to this piece in the first place.

In loving memory of Ben Erickson - riff in peace, dude.

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Brian Matthew Hart

Bouquet

Sometimes, a photograph can be a beginning; a starting point. This work was created with that idea in mind.

Through rotation & reflection of a subset of each constituent photograph's original set of pixels, new forms emerge based off of those captured with the camera. They bend and stretch and grow into something new and 'impossible'.

While some may argue manipulation of a photograph is in some way a lie, I view my efforts here as another way to examine the world around me, and re-inject a humanness to digital photography.

See more of my explorations by visiting www.instagram.com/@brain____________________heart

Thanks for taking some time out of your day to view my work.

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Christopher Selleck

protection/sports complex

STATEMENT:

As a gay man, I have always felt like an outside observer to masculinity.  I have tried to express this sense of alienation in the self-portraits I created for the series protection/sports complex.  Utilizing uniforms, equipment and lighting I perform or portray the idealized role of an athlete, while concealing my inner reality and identity.  Growing up, I felt I had to assume these roles, among others, as a way to achieve and prove my own masculinity.

BIOGRAPHY:

Christopher Selleck has been making photographs for over 20 years.  Using sports and masculinity as a lens to view identity, his various projects of the last few years have focused on this area.  Working with film, instant and digital processes his work has always had a strong affinity for portraits and self-portraits.  He received his BFA in Photography from the University of MN Twin Cities, and his work has been published and exhibited both regionally and nationally. He is currently in his 2nd year of the MFA Program at the Minneapolis College of Art & Design.  His current projects include MMA Fighters, Beards, Bodybuilders and

www.christopherselleck.squarespace.com

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Maggie Thompson

In Loss

My piece addresses the “Reflection” theme because I am reflecting on my experience of losing a parent. My Dad passed away on March 26th, 2014 from pancreatic cancer. Grief is a highly personal experience in that every individual’s process in unique. This piece reflects my experience of dealing with depression and anxiety since losing my Dad. The woven image is composed of two self portraits; by weaving these photographs together the two images become distorted in order to demonstrate a heightened experience of hysteria and anxiety, overwhelming the viewer.

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Pat Benincasa

What is Absent is Not Forgotten

Whether the land itself holds memory or there is residual energy from those who were here before us – my creative expression resides in a collective memory that once shaped our national life.  Art is a timeless lens to see where future meets the past in the form of these magnificent worksites. What is absent is not forgotten.

My work explores a people who shaped their locale through sweat and labor in iconic industrial sites during the 20th century. Cities built around these mammoth blast furnaces, steel yards and auto factories appeared indestructible with their perpetual buzz of continuous production. The decline of manufacturing swept though these cities like a catastrophic disease, leaving deserted city blocks, empty storefronts and hulking ruins.

If memories reconstruct our past, then examining these demolished work sites offers a rich, reflective frame of reference of what “Made Here” once meant-- and could mean now.  Taking this assumption further, the “Rust Belt Cities” are repurposing themselves with an “urban authenticity.” This authenticity is based on their historic manufacturing roots and regional identities.  They are revitalizing themselves by attracting artists, writers, designers and creative entrepreneurs. 

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gillian mclaughlin

New Moon's in the Alley

In the simplest of terms relating to reflection, Earth’s moon is often thought to shed it’s own light when it is really reflecting the light of our sun. It is a completely dark rock that has held our fascination for centuries. As people we have marveled at it’s beauty and mystery for ages. From it’s bright white glare to ruddy golds and reds, these have all been borrowed from the white hot sun and have captured our imaginations as we look up into the night sky. We are familiar with only one side but it changes every night for us, little by little throughout our orbit we see it’s beauty and demeanor build and swell only to shrink and nearly vanish before starting all over again. 

It’s long been believed that the moon has some sort of power over us, similar to the pull it has on our ocean tides. My love for the moon is unabashed, I’ve had my chin tilted toward the night sky for most of my life and have yearned to reach up and understand the way it seems to push and pull me. There are specific phases of the moon that have become so prevalent in my life, seemingly attached to defining events from a great love to great loss, often causing me to wonder and reflect upon these times should I glance upward to find a particular moon looking down upon me. As if it were my own mirror, I search for meaning and hope to reflect a little light of my own.

gillian mclaughlin is a Minneapolis based artist working in mixed media, primarily graphic art and screen printing. Currently she runs a small custom screen printing and design studio in Northeast Minneapolis.

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Amy Sands

Kaleidoscope

Reflection is defined as both “the throwing back by a body or surface of light, heat or sound without absorbing it” as well as “serious thought or consideration” (Google definitions).

I am interested in how the audience experiences their own image reflecting in these mandala-like forms, as well as how they find a contemplative space for reflection. In my process, hand-drawn doily images of family heritage are translated into digital files for a CNC router to follow. This process is both physical and delicate. I am particularly engrossed by the translation of light and shadows as they pass through this matrix. The artwork exists in a continuum where the shadows shift and change over time as it is displayed in different environments. The pieces are both complex and serene, creating an arena for reflection.

Amy Sands is a Minneapolis based artist working in mixed-media, printmaking and installation. Much of her artwork utilizes printmaking-based techniques that expand into three-dimensional forms. Sands achieved her MFA degree from Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, NY, in 1995. Her work has been included in exhibits such as Prints Tokyo 2012, Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2nd Global Print 2015, Douro, Portugal, and the 8th International Printmaking Biennial 2016, Douro, Portugal, as well as many local and national exhibitions.  Sands also teaches locally at Minneapolis College of Art and Design and Metropolitan State University.

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Leslie Barlow

Mirror Image

Much of my work has to do with reflecting on the human experience and social structures that we operate within and perpetuate. I use my own personal experiences to take a critical look at how we as people create identity (through both external and internal forces) and move through the world. “Mirror Image” pushes these investigations further to focus on a reflection of place (i.e. home, community, landscape) and how it contributes to personal identity.  To utilize a public thoroughfare in which to present the work enriches the potential conversations this large-scale piece can create–about community and where one is really “from”.  In the piece I layer multiple materials and processes as that is reflective of my practice currently (I have been doing a lot of experimentation with combining various methods and medias), as well as reflective of different themes I work with like hybridity, otherness, and the complexity of multilayered identity.

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Leslie Barlow is an artist living and working in Minneapolis, MN.  Primarily an oil painter, Barlow's current work uses the figure and narrative elements to talk about issues related to multiculturalism, "otherness", and identity.  Barlow layers colors, subtleties and symbolism in her work. These techniques help her to construct paintings that allude to the multilayers and complexities of race, experiences, and identity. As a person of mixed race, this work is vital to her understanding of herself as well as the world around her.

Barlow received her BFA in Painting with Honors from the University of Wisconsin-Stout, and is currently completing her MFA at the Minneapolis College of Art and Design.  Barlow has exhibited her work throughout the Twin Cities and the Midwest, and has received numerous awards for her paintings. Most recent awards include from the Minnesota State Fair Juried Exhibition in 2015, and from the national juried exhibition at the Washington Pavilion Museum of Arts and Sciences in Sioux Falls, SD in 2014.  Barlow’s work has also been featured in a number of publications and interviews in print, web, and on television.

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Jeffrey Haddorff

I currently make big, tippy, sloppy, organic abstract painted sculpture from clay. Approximations of refined shapes that may or may not remain standing for any given period of time, yet really trying to do so. Trying to be beautiful and important and a coherent whole. Aspirational and complete. 

www.jeffreyhaddorff.com

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Aaron Brand

Aaron Brand Design

Aaron Brand is a multifaceted artist that uses objects to create signature artworks and environments. His work gravitates towards the glamorous side of industrial design, with a efficacy on clever assembly.

Lighting is a common theme in his work, but there is nothing "off limits" when it comes to his process, and entertains all genres of design.

The highlighted work consists of 12 pounds and 135 square feet of shredded money. The title references a common saying when it comes to most projects, "All's you need is time...and money". This works intentions is concentrated on size, texture and symbolism, and was created exclusively for #MadeHereMN and the opening of the newest Mall of America expansion.

This work is available for purchase. Please contact AaronBrandDesign via web or Facebook. #AaronBrandDesign #MadehEREMN

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Christopher E. Harrison

Reflections of a Black Boy

I’m Christopher E. Harrison (1965, Springfield, Ohio USA). I make paintings, drawings, sculptures and mixed media artworks.

I love the visual and tactile impact of surface and it is the key element in my work.

My current suite of artwork uses appropriated images that address the depersonalization and dissection of the Black cultural persona through visually obscuring the Black physical form using collage, textured materials and text.

I have come to see my current approach as a form of political and civic engagement for myself and others. This view has grown out of my experiences trying to magnify social issues within Black culture through art and the development of my identity as a citizen and as a Black male, as someone inspired by the politics of societal relations. I want art to be not only something through which we perceive the world, but addressing ways of reforming it.

I use painting and collage as my creative expression, using materials (sand, paper plaster, photo images, etc.) in small to medium sizes that reference classical art mediums combined with contemporary techniques, trying to balance the interaction between these to create visual stimulation and to symbolize the appropriation of ideas and concepts that embody the Black experience. I find inspiration in the works of Robert Rauschenberg, Rene Magritte, Jean Michel Basquiat, Romare Bearden, Pop Art, Abstract Expressionism and African Art.

I currently live and work in Minneapolis MN.

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Zach Nagle

Fashion

"Advertising photography is painstakingly planned and edited to create idealized reflections of the world. These images, torn from fashion magazines, are the source material for my work. Distortion is created by physically moving the picture across a scanner while the scan head is in motion. The resulting images explore our relationship to advertising, and its effects on our behavior, expectations, and aspirations."

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Tara Costello

City Scape

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Bailey Cahlander

Twin Cities

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St. Paul Slim

The Moments: #NeverBasic

Take a trip through different eras of pop culture from the 60s icons to today’s superstars. Experience the true meaning of art imitating life. A mixture of emotions expressed through bright colors, acrylic paintings, multimedia mediums to including Art on clothing for your Joy and Amazement.

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The Minneapolis Beard & Moustache Club

To Beard or not to Beard

Have you ever wondered what you would look like with a beard? Ever dreamed of the wind flowing through your magnificent chin curtain only to have that beautiful image ripped from your psyche upon waking?  Have you ever fancied a mustache to compliment that gorgeous mug of a face? The Minneapolis Beard and Mustache Club (MBMC) invite you to ponder these quandaries by “trying on” just a few of the many facial hair styles there are to choose from.  To Beard or Not to Beard provides a safe environment to explore and reflect on the possibilities, free of potential ridicule, and the time commitment needed to sport your own Imperial Partial, Handlebar, Old Dutch, or Musketeer.  Additionally, this opportunity for reflection is not simply a personal journey, but one to contemplate and share with your cohorts; whether they’re presently at your side, or across the world.

More than a simple silhouette-style decal placed on a mirror for the occasional laugh or surprise, our installation uses photos of real beards from real MBMC members.  What’s more, by mounting the beards closer to your face, the reflection in the mirror is much more realistic from your own perspective and varying adjacent viewpoints.  This affords you a greater variety of locations for your camera or phone to capture this experience in the everlasting visage of a selfie.  So go ahead, pick a beard and try it on.  Read about the men who sport these glorious whiskers.  Visit us on the web at www.thembmc.com and see what we’re all about.  And, most importantly, share your experience and pictures through your preferred social media outlets.  We hope this installation proves a fun and inspiring venture for you and perhaps you’ll be encouraged to make a go of it yourself.  After all, in the words of MBMC founder MJ Johnson, “Until you try, you never know what you can grow.”

- The Minneapolis Beard and Mustache Club 

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Jim Denomie

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James Wrayge

Expedition and other works

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Sandi Thompson

Reflections of Freedom

These paintings are made by pouring an acrylic paint mixture onto canvas and manipulating the canvas in different directions to create shape and mixing of color.  No paint brushes or tools are used in the pour paintings. The more the canvas is moved, the more intertwined the colors become. Every painting is one of a kind and no two could ever be the same.

There is a sense of freedom that comes from the abstract. The restraints of perfection are lifted and creativity is allowed to flow unencumbered.

Sandi Thompson is a Kansas native, living in Minnesota since 2005. In 2014 she received her Associate's degree in photography and digital imaging from Minneapolis Community and Technical College and enjoys portrait photography. In other artwork she primarily uses acrylic paint and alcohol inks.

 

 

 

 

 

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Urban Walking Gallery

Made Here, a project of Hennepin Theatre Trust, is a walkable urban art experience that connects people to local art and artists in the West Downtown Minneapolis Cultural District.

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Reflection 2016